Danish Working Holiday

Home > Danish Working Holiday

Danish Working Holiday

 

Denmark is a northern Europe country.  It “sits” on top of Germany but it is also thought of as a Scandinavian country, along with Sweden and Norway.  It was the land of the Vikings, but now it is a rich and prosperous country with highly developed social systems.  The Danish language is linked to other Scandinavian languages, but English is universally spoken.

Visa Eligibility

For members of the European Union and EFTA, the European Free Trade Association are able to work in Denmark without the need for a visa. Denmark has agreements with the following countries regarding working holiday visas. These are:-

South Korea, New Zealand, Canada, Chile, Japan, Australia and Argentina.

  • You must be aged between 18 and 30.
  • You should not bring any accompanying children with you.
  • You should show a bank statement to show that you have enough funds for the stay.
  • You must show that you are in good health.
  • You can only work for 6 months.
  • You can only work for 3 months with the same employer.
  • A working holiday permit can only be granted for one year, and can not be extended.
Specific Job Opportunities

By going onto the job search facility, on the above link, and type in Denmark, you will find a summary of the work that is available.

Hospitality Jobs

This involves working in bars, pubs, hotels, restaurants, cafes, receptions, laundry work, ground keeping gardening and maintenance along with odd jobs  This area of work is ideal for anyone on a traveling working holiday.  It does not necessarily require too many prior skills. You should be able to quickly “learn on the job”.  Again, a number of these job areas will entail a lot of socializing. This is an ideal way to meet local people, as well as meeting people from other countries and cultures. Previous experience might help, but what would be useful if you are dressed neatly and naturally have an outgoing personality.

Child Care work

This involves working as an Au Pair or Nanny.  In Denmark, this will quite often mean “living in”, meals may well be provided.  This might also mean the use of a car is thrown in as well. You may be asked to take young children to kindergarten, or to their schools and back. To accompany them t the park or to play areas. With very young children, you could be asked to “change them” and bathe them.  There may be general cleaning duties as well.

Agricultural Work

There is seasonal work in this area available.  For example, the strawberry picking season is June and July.  The cherry-picking season is July and August. While apples are harvested between   September and October.

Voluntary work in Denmark

This is a very interesting avenue that could be explored.  Obviously, you will need the funds to cover all of this.

 

Voluntary work in Denmark

To start with this is the official EU (European Union) web site for more information:

http://europa.eu/youth/volunteering/evs-organisation_en

You will see on this site that a wide range of countries are allowed to take part, and that it encompasses a wide range of different activities. Apart from Jutland that extends from northern Germany, there are many small islands which extend into the North Sea and Baltic Sea.  This area is rich in archaeology and history. Going back to the vikings and through the middle ages, leading to today. This provides a very rich historical tapestry.  If you embark on this volunteering course, you will be working with local people and will really get to know the Danish people and the Danish country side.

Apart from Jutland that extends from northern Germany, there are many small islands which extend into the North Sea and Baltic Sea.  This area is rich in archaeology and history. Going back to the vikings and through the middle ages, leading to today. This provides a very rich historical tapestry.  If you embark on this volunteering course, you will be working with local people and will really get to know the Danish people and the Danish country side.

Youth in Action

This is a European Union initiative which gives young people, between the ages of 13 and 30, the opportunity to be involved in volunteer work. This will be for the duration of between 2 and 12 months as a volunteer.

Danish Refugee Aid

Sadly, this is a fact of life in Denmark, given the enormous upheavals in other parts of the world. By being a volunteer in Denmark, in this area of work , you could make a big contribution to this aspect of volunteer work.

 

 

 

Specific Immigration Requirements

At present all the official Danish Immigration sites appear to be off line.  However, this site is online:

http://um.dk/en/travel-and-residence/residence-and-or-work-permits

For directly applying for any visa, you must always have your passport with you. This must be a valid current passport, clearly showing the passport number, the date it was issued and the date it will be expired.  If the expiry date is due soon, this could well cause you problems when you applying for a Danish working Holiday visa. Please make sure that you plan ahead. That your passport is updated prior to the visa application.

There may be the need to bring other supporting documentation as well. Also note, that copies will be required to be made of your passport.  Failure to do this could result in a fine being served.

Where can you apply from?

For those wanting to obtain the working holiday, there is only a limited number of countries that are eligible for this scheme.

You are able to download a detailed pdf file, showing precise details regarding the location and other details, of each Danish Mission or office who can process an application form. To take a few examples of participating countries in this Danish working Holiday working holiday.

Chile: Here you are asked to contact the Norwegian embassy in Santiago.  This is another clear indication of the Scandinavian link and cooperation.

Hong Kong: You are asked to go to the Finish embassy in Hong Kong. This is another example of the cooperation of Finland, a Baltic state, with Denmark a Scandinavian state.  There are problems noted here , about obtaining long term visas.

New Zealand: This is more straight forward.  You apply to Auckland, where there is an outsourcing office. It is well worth visiting Denmark, for a Danish working holiday. If you use an agency or organize this yourself, or decide to do the volunteering scheme, this could be a very worth wile experience.

Click for Free
Assessment